Image credit: Ben Zank; Via cibermitanios

Image credit: Ben Zank; Via cibermitanios

rhamphotheca:

entomolog:  The Eastern Dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus) male

(by Eurofins on Flickr)
The adult dobsonfly is a large insect up to 140 millimetres long with a wingspan of up to 125 millimetres.[5] The female has short powerful mandibles of a similar size to those of the larva while the mandibles of the male are sickle-shaped and up to 40 millimetres long, half as long as the body.
(read more: wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

entomolog The Eastern Dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus) male

(by Eurofins on Flickr)

The adult dobsonfly is a large insect up to 140 millimetres long with a wingspan of up to 125 millimetres.[5] The female has short powerful mandibles of a similar size to those of the larva while the mandibles of the male are sickle-shaped and up to 40 millimetres long, half as long as the body.

(read more: wikipedia)

'Kind of Dobsonfly declared largest known living aquatic insect'

Image credits: Insect Museum of West China; text credit: Bob Yirka

Workers with the Insect Museum of West China have verified the largest aquatic insect in the world today, pipping the previous largest known - the South American helicopter damselfly, by 2 centimetres.

The dobsonfly is common in India, China, Africa, South America, and some other parts of Asia, but is sensitive to pollution, so is used by ecologists as a metric for water cleanliness. The IMWC were given several samples, collected in China’s Sichuan province.

The adults make little use of either their huge jaws or wings; the former being used only during sex, in the week when they come out into the open. Due to their huge size, the males’ jaws are unable to achieve much torque and so are unable to pierce human skin. And their wings are rarely used as they scrabble around rocks, or underwater.

Its larval form is used as bait, by fishermen, an lives in the same streams that it haunts as an adult, which is what makes it an aquatic species. Its huge wings in the adult form are, of course, better suited to life out of water.

Featured here.

rhamphotheca:

Dobsonflies (subfamily Corydalinae, family Corydalidae)
Dobsonflies are in the insect order Megaloptera. There are over 220 species. They are found throughout the Americas and Asia, as well as South Africa. Their closest relatives are the fishflies. Both sexes can reach lengths up to five in. (12.5 cm), from pincer tips to wingtips. Their wingspans can be 2x as long as body length. The wings are densely lined with intersecting veins. When not in use, the wings are folded along the length of their bodies. Dobsonflies have long, multi-segmented antennae.

(photo: male Corydalus cornutus, NY, USA, by Mike Bell)
Males have large relatively weak pincers, used only in mating, and females have strong short sharp pincers which may deliver a painful bite. They are not venomous, but possess an irritating, foul-smelling anal spray as a last-ditch defense.

(larva, Cave Creek, Chiricahua Mts., AZ, USA, by Don Ehlan)
Dobsonflies spend most of their life in the larval stage, during which they are called “hellgrammites”. Hellgrammites live under rocks at the bottoms of lakes, streams and rivers, and prey on other insect larvae…
(read more: Wikipedia)
(top photo: female Protohermes grandis, Kobe, Japan, by OpenCage)

rhamphotheca:

Dobsonflies (subfamily Corydalinae, family Corydalidae)

Dobsonflies are in the insect order Megaloptera. There are over 220 species. They are found throughout the Americas and Asia, as well as South Africa. Their closest relatives are the fishflies. Both sexes can reach lengths up to five in. (12.5 cm), from pincer tips to wingtips. Their wingspans can be 2x as long as body length. The wings are densely lined with intersecting veins. When not in use, the wings are folded along the length of their bodies. Dobsonflies have long, multi-segmented antennae.

image

(photo: male Corydalus cornutus, NY, USA, by Mike Bell)

Males have large relatively weak pincers, used only in mating, and females have strong short sharp pincers which may deliver a painful bite. They are not venomous, but possess an irritating, foul-smelling anal spray as a last-ditch defense.

image

(larva, Cave Creek, Chiricahua Mts., AZ, USA, by Don Ehlan)

Dobsonflies spend most of their life in the larval stage, during which they are called “hellgrammites”. Hellgrammites live under rocks at the bottoms of lakes, streams and rivers, and prey on other insect larvae…

(read more: Wikipedia)

(top photo: female Protohermes grandis, Kobe, Japan, by OpenCage)

'Protohermes grandis (a dobsonfly)'
Image credit: OpenCage; text credit: Anon Wiki; Via rhamphotheca
"Protohermes grandis is a large, colorful species of dobsonfly occurring in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.”

'Protohermes grandis (a dobsonfly)'

Image credit: OpenCage; text credit: Anon Wiki; Via rhamphotheca

"Protohermes grandis is a large, colorful species of dobsonfly occurring in China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.”

rhamphotheca:

entomolog: The Eastern Dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus) male
(by Vilseskogen on Flickr)

The Eastern Dobsonfly, Corydalus cornutus, is a large insect in the Corydalidae family. It is found in eastern North America in regions with fast-flowing streams where its aquatic larvae develop. These are known as hellgrammites and are the top invertebrate predators in the streams in which they live. They are used by anglers as bait.
(read more: wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

entomologThe Eastern Dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus) male

(by Vilseskogen on Flickr)

The Eastern Dobsonfly, Corydalus cornutus, is a large insect in the Corydalidae family. It is found in eastern North America in regions with fast-flowing streams where its aquatic larvae develop. These are known as hellgrammites and are the top invertebrate predators in the streams in which they live. They are used by anglers as bait.

(read more: wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

tagmata: female Dobsonfly (Platyneuromus sp.), Cusuco National Park, Honduras
(photo by asnyder5)

rhamphotheca:

tagmatafemale Dobsonfly (Platyneuromus sp.), Cusuco National Park, Honduras

(photo by asnyder5)

'Funnies #1'

A small collection of funny things written in various places.

Sources for pic 1; pic 2; pic 3; pic 4; pic 5; pic 6.

Featured here.

Tags: funny weird Signs

'Food to Scale 1:12'

Via Cibermitanios

Featured here.

'Promise me woman to woman love scenes'
"BRIT-Award winner Beverley Craven’s 2014 UK Tour, supporting the release of her new album, Change of Heart. Beverley will be performing her new songs live alongside timeless classics; Promise Me, Woman to Woman, Love Scenes and many more. An evening of poignant sentiments, nostalgia and even the odd tear.”
I saw this in a local theatre’s ‘What’s On?’ guide. I couldn’t help but think of 'One Foot In The Grave' as i was uploading it. And i’ve got to admit.. i might actually go to see it… on the off-chance :-D
Featured here.

'Promise me woman to woman love scenes'

"BRIT-Award winner Beverley Craven’s 2014 UK Tour, supporting the release of her new album, Change of Heart. Beverley will be performing her new songs live alongside timeless classics; Promise Me, Woman to Woman, Love Scenes and many more. An evening of poignant sentiments, nostalgia and even the odd tear.”

I saw this in a local theatre’s ‘What’s On?’ guide. I couldn’t help but think of 'One Foot In The Grave' as i was uploading it. And i’ve got to admit.. i might actually go to see it… on the off-chance :-D

Featured here.

'New fossil shows Archaeopteryx sported feathered trousers'

Image credit: Nature - Christian Foth, Helmut Tischlinger & Oliver W. M. Rauhut; Via Phys.org

Humans might have worn trousers as far back as 4000 years ago, but Archaeopteryx was wearing feathery trousers 150 million years ago!

This bolsters the current scientific perception that feathers were evolved for display, before becoming viable for gliding/flight, as such leg trousers would have served only a sexual function.

At ~4 centimetres long, and being symmetrical, they would not have worked well for catching air, but could easily have been lined with pigment, as with modern birds, for display.

Featured here.

Image 1: a, Right wing from dorsal view. b, Leg feathers of the right hindlimb. c, Detail of leg feathers of right hindlimb. d, Detail of body plumage from the belly region. e, Overview of tail feathers. f, Detail of asymmetrical feathers at the lateral side of the tail. Arrow in a indicates gap in the wing caused by the overlapping left foot. Scale bars, 1 cm.

Image 2: bp, body plumage; ft, feather ‘trousers’; hf, hackle feathers; lh, left hindlimb; n, neck; rf, right forelimb; rh, right hindlimb; rw, right wing; s, skull remains; t, tail; tf, tail feathers. Scale bar, 5 cm.

Image 3: a, Overview photograph of the 11th skeletal specimen of Archaeopteryx. Scale bar, 5 cm. b, Presacral vertebral column. Scale bar, 2 cm. c, Right forelimb. Scale bar, 5 cm.

Image 4: a, Primary wing feathers under ultraviolet light. b, First and second primary and first secondary wing feathers under ultraviolet light. c, Close up of the primary feathers showing the rhachides and the barbs. d, Close up of the metatarsal feathers. Scale bar, 1 cm.

Image 5: yellow, body feathers from different body regions, which cannot be assigned to a certain body region; light blue, heckle feathers; sky blue, body feathers; dark blue, tibial feathers; red, femoral feathers; black, metatarsal feathers; light green, rectrices; green, remiges. Scale bar, 5 cm.

'See Whatever You Want To See'

Can you see whatever you want to see? Well, i don’t see any tapejaras, in any of these pictures, so no. But our expectations can influence our perceptions. That’s how pareidolia works - how people see a man in the moon, mo on mars, and a mythical figure they’ve never met in cheese toasties, apples, air conditioning units, functions from above, and u-bends.

Featured here.

(Source: micro.cibermitanios.com.ar)